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Sports Car

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What is Sports Car?

A sports car (sports car) is a small, usually two seater, two door automobile designed for spirited performance and nimble handling. According to the Merriam-Webster dictionary, the first known use of the term was in 1928.

Sports cars may be Spartan or luxurious, but high manoeuvrability and minimum weight are requisite. They may be equipped for racing, "especially an aerodynamically shaped one-passenger or two-passenger vehicle having a low centre of gravity and steering and suspension designed for precise control at high speeds."

Some sports cars have small back seats that are really only suitable for luggage or small children. Such a configuration is often referred to as a 2+2. The more typical seating arrangement is two-seats.

Over the years, some manufacturers of sports cars have sought to increase the practicality of their vehicles by increasing the seating room.

 

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History of Sports Car:-

The basis for the sports car is traced to the early 20th century touring cars and roadsters. These raced in early rallies, such as the Herkimer Cup, Prinz-Heinrich-Fehr, and Monte Carlo.

Though the term sports car would not be coined until after World War One, the first sports cars are considered to be the 3 litre 1910 Prince Henry (Prinz Heinrich) Vauxhall 20 hp (tax rating) and the 27/80PS Austro-Daimler designed by Ferdinand Porsche.

In the U.S., where the type was variously called roadster, speedster, runabout, or race about, there was Apperson, Kassel, Marion, Midland, National, Overland, Stoddard-Dayton, and Thomas among small models, while Chadwick, Mercer, Stutz, and Simplex were among large models.

In 1921, Ballot premiered its 2LS, with a remarkable 75 hp (56 kW) DOHC two litter, designed by Ernest Henry (formerly of Peugeot's Grand Prix program), capable of 150 km/h (93 mph); at most, one hundred were built in four years. This was followed by the SOHC 2LT and 2LTS. The same year, Benz built a supercharged 28/95PS four for the Copa Florio; Max Sailor won.

Simson in 1924 offered a Paul Henze-designed 60 hp (45 kW) DOHC 2 litter four, the Simson Supra Type S, in a long-wheelbase 120 km/h (75 mph) tourer and 115 km/h (71 mph) twin-carburettor sportier; only thirty were sold, against around three hundred of the SOHC model and 750 of the pushrod-six Type R. Duerkopp's Zolner-blown two litter in 1924, as well.

There was a clear cleavage by 1925. As four-seaters were more profitable, two-seaters increasingly turned over to specialist manufacturers, led by Alvis, Aston-Martin, and Frazer-Nash, with shoestring budgets, fanatic followers, and limited sales (today exemplified by Aston and Morgan): between 1921 and 1939, 350 Astons were built; 323 Frazer-Nashis in the period 1924–39.

By the end of the 1920s, AC produced a 2-liter six, the 3.5 litter Nazaro had a three-valve OHC (until 1922), while French makers Amilcar, Bagman and Samson, and Franco-Spanish Hispano-Suzie, had the typical small four-cylinder sorters and Deluge, Hotchkiss, and Chenard-Walcker the large tourers. Benz introduced the powerful SS and SSK, and Alfa Romeo, the Vittorio Jana-designed 6C.

Hispano-Suzie’s Alfonso XIII is considered the first sport car developed between 1911 and 1914.

Two companies would offer really reliable sports cars: Austin with the Seven and Morris Garages (MG) with the Midget. The Seven would quickly be "rodded" by numerous companies (as the Type 1 would be a generation later), including Bassett and Dingle (Hammersmith, London); in 1928, a Colette blower was fitted to the Seven Super Sports, while Cecil Kimber fitted an 847 cc Minor engine, and sold more Midgets in the first year than MG's entire previous production.

 

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