SchoolChalao

  • Helpline: +91-8058868746
  • Mail us: help@schoolchalao.com
  • LOGIN | REGISTER
    Tutorial Library

Learning Point

Lala Lajpat Rai

Previous Next

Lajpat Rai was born in Dhudike (now in Moga district, Punjab) on 28 January 1865. (The word 'Lala' is an honorific, applied to prominent Hindu men of the time.) His father was in the Aggarwal caste. Rai had his initial education in Government Higher Secondary School, Rewari (now in Haryana, previously in Punjab), in the late 1870s and early 1880s, where his father, Radha Krishan, was an Urdu teacher. Rai was influenced by Hinduism and created a career of reforming Indian policy through politics and writing.

 

school-chalao-lala-lajpa-rtai1 image

 

Nationalism:-

After joining the Indian National Congress and taking part in political agitation in the Punjab, Lajpat Rai was deported to Mandalay, Burma, without trial on May 1907. In November, however, he was allowed to return when the viceroy, Lord Minto, decided that there was insufficient evidence to hold him for subversion. Lajpat Rai's supporters attempted to secure his election to the presidency of the party session at Surat on December 1907, but elements favouring co-operation with the British refused to accept him, and the party split.

Graduates of the National College, which he founded inside the Brad laugh Hall at Lahore as an alternative to British institutions, included Bhagat Singh. He was elected President of the Indian National Congress in the Calcutta Special Session of 1920. In 1921, He founded Servants of the People Society, a non-profit welfare organisation, in Lahore, which shifted based to Delhi after partition, and has branches in many parts of India.

 

Protests against Simon Commission:-

In 1928, the British government set up the Commission, headed by Sir John Simon, to report on the political situation in India. The Indian political parties boycotted the Commission, because it did not include a single Indian in its membership, and it met with country-wide protests. When the Commission visited Lahore on 30 October 1928, Lajpat Rai led silent march in protest against it. The superintendent of police, James A. Scott, ordered the police to lathi charge the protesters and personally assaulted Rai. Despite being injured, Rai subsequently addressed the crowd and said, "I declare that the blows struck at me today will be the last nails in the coffin of British rule in India".

 

Death:-

He did not fully recover from his injuries and died on 17 November 1928 of a heart attack.

 

Very Useful (0)

Useful (0)

Not Useful (0)